Katrina... Lingering Eternally.... 10 Years Later...


Katrina... Lingering Eternally.... 10 Years Later...
By- Brandon Kolby Jacobs

So, let's be mature adults about this and understand as much as the story of Hurricane Katrina is the story of a Hurricane decimating a region of the country, the REAL story of Hurricane Katrina is the story of modern day population control, minority eradication, gentrification and the reinvention of "Trail of Tears" recreated for the another people of color that the United States has continually shown little or no respect for... 

"Where were you when Katrina hit?"

I had just moved from Tallahassee, FL back to Jacksonville, so I can't say I really felt the weight of what was taking place. Hell, I probably wouldn't have had any sense of the rain that Tallahassee felt, let alone what the people who were in Mississippi, Alabama, and Louisiana were going through, but I spoke to a friend I knew from the Air Force who was from New Orleans very briefly who told me initially that things were pretty bad, but to him it didn't seem like something worth leaving town over and that he was gonna stick it out. I think that for many people from the area the Hurricane was initially, "just another hurricane." For New Orleans specifically, it wasn't until the levies broke that shit goes left...

Now do I think that there was a conspiracy to eradicate the over 60% African American population in New Orleans by intentionally breaking the levees? No. But what I do and would maintain is the fault of the US government was an unwillingness to respond to not just the recovery, but SAVING PEOPLES LIVES in a socially responsible way. They failed the niggas because it's easy to fail those you already had little or no respect for. So perhaps there were some significant engineering failures due to a lack of consistent evaluation of the status of the levees, but that wasn't because of some illuminati effort to wait on a hurricane to show up and wipe not thousands, but hundreds of thousands, off the map... that's simply not giving a fuck about doing your job and killing us off by the levees breaking and drowning men, women and children of color was just a convenient byproduct of that. But I've never thought that it was planned out for Hollygrove, Magnolia, and the other projects to be destroyed like that... but I'm not from New Orleans, so maybe I'm wrong.  


The number isn't 1800 deaths... it's far more THAT I am certain of, but no one remembers the faceless and nameless homeless population that didn't have anywhere else to go when the hurricane hit. We have to keep in mind too, there are still houses in places in New Orleans and the surrounding areas of the Gulf that were boarded up and never opened again. You think all of those empty houses and piles of rubble of what used to be someones home are empty of bodies? I doubt it... but that's just me

My friend who decided to try and ride the storm out is safe now... but things didn't go as planned. He and his daughter realized after the flooding got substantial that they needed to get out of the city, but that realization came around the same time that other had the same revelation which was just around the same time that the levees began to fail and water started to pour in. I think a lot of people have always been under the assumption that when that water came pouring in that it was a slow and steady process... it wasn't. It was very much so a wave of water that drowned thousands of people. You think people wouldn't have left is the water was slowly creeping under their doorways? When the water came pouring in my friend had his daughters hand and they were wading through the water toward the Superdome... and the water hit is daughter and her hand let go of his hand... as soon as he realized he didn't feel her anymore he instantly turned around and couldn't find her in the mass of people wading in the water and heading to the Superdome... Thinking he had lost his daughter, he like many others got on a bus wondering what the future was going to hold... he's one of the lucky ones. He was bused to Houston, TX and about 4 months later he was contacted that his daughter had been found... she was in St. Louis, MO with another family who found her in the midst of all the water and chaos. She's a teenager now and seems to be doing well, but the nightmares of that time period I know still plague her... as I'm sure they do everyone who went through it.

So now, ten years later the city of New Orleans isn't the same place it once was. The culture that resonated from the indigenous population that once called the now eradicated wards home are now making new places home. Sure they're grateful to be alive, but unlike those of us who can extend sympathies and go home and look at the photos of our grandparents, pictures of our kids growing up, cling to heirlooms that remind us of how lucky we are... these people, who are now all over the United States don't have those opportunities. The high school footballs are gone, the prom pictures are gone, the heirlooms paced down for 150yrs are in a pile of rubble... to obtain the simple things isn't so simple for the survivors of Katrina and when we talk about what Katrina means 10yrs later, sure it is about the levees, possible conspiracies, the governments lack of response, the cities willingness to forget those who were there before the storm and be okay with not providing a place for them to come back to, but more than anything it's about that feeling we all have when we go into that box in the back of our closet and get to reflect on the memories of yesteryear... they don't have that. And ten years later... that loss still lingers....

May we never forget where in modern day America, we let a city of people down...



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